The Legacy of Karl Marx

Issue 1807

13 July 2018

When asked about the criterion for recognizing the greatness of a philosopher, Hegel suggested we let two centuries pass and then consider what remains of their achievement. This adage can appropriately be applied to Karl Marx, one of Hegel’s best-known scholars. On the bicentennial of his birth, Marx continues to be talked about; although in the last 30 years in a less prominent way.[1]

It is certainly difficult to take complete stock of what Marx represented and continues to represent. This is due to the vastness, complexity and ardent tones that accompanied his thought, and also to the difficulty of specifying the coherency of the (equally numerous) political implementations inspired by him.[2] In this contribution two aspects will be focused on which in my opinion are still relevant today: the first, the paradoxical nature of his thought; the second, his critique of savage capitalism.

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