Green Urbanization: A conversation with John DeGioia

Issue 1904

11 April 2019

La Civiltà Cattolica and Georgetown University unite in a forum

On December 11, 2018, at the home of La Civiltà Cattolica in Rome, the first public meeting took place of the China Forum for Civilization Dialogue. This is a platform for dialogue between China and the West that originates in the collaboration between this journal and Georgetown University.[1] The first meeting was dedicated to the theme Global Ecological Crisis: Chinese and Western Perspectives. Speakers included the well-known journalist, author and three-time Pulitzer Prize winner Thomas Friedman, and Professor Wang Jisi, Director of the Center for International and Strategic Studies, Peking University and a former dean of the School of International Studies, Peking University. Moderating was Paul Elie, Senior Fellow at Georgetown University as well as a journalist and writer.

The China Forum intends to host expert seminars and high-level public events in globally important cities, including Rome, Washington, D.C., San Francisco and Beijing. A first seminar, hosted by the Ricci Institute for Chinese-Western Cultural History at the University of San Francisco, gathered Chinese and Western scholars in August 2018 to address the changing role of humanities education in a global context. The first public event was the one that took place at the Roman home of our journal.

The president of Georgetown University, John J. DeGioia, was present at that meeting. He had also participated at the meeting “Green Urbanization and Innovation” at the Chinese Council for International Cooperation on the Environment and Development (CCICED) in China on November 2, 2018.[2] In China, reflections on this theme are in constant growth.[3]

The Roman encounter that took place on December 11, 2018, was an occasion for a short conversation with President DeGioia on the themes of the environment and urbanization, starting from the Chinese meeting he had attended. At a time of global silence there is a need to hear the voices that are being raised institutionally to think differently about cities, which are called to be safer and more sustainable.

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